Category: diet

So, You Are Thinking About Doing Your First Show

Whatever the choice of activity to get fit is, whether running, biking, lifting, swimming, etc., a small population will be taken enough with their chosen sport enough to want to take the challenge on of competing.  For runners, some will get the bug to prepare for and run a marathon.  For the gym rats who love lifting heavy, some will get the bug to enter a powerlifting meet.  Other gym rats will gravitate to physique competitions.  Since I get asked about the latter pretty regularly, let me share some lessons learned.

My Beer League Team Has a Hockey and Beer Belly Problem (Or Can I Lose The Beer Belly, But Keep the Beer?)

I get asked a lot about beer and how it affects fitness. Over the years, a lot of that has come after a rec league hockey game, tournament, or drop-in when the most cherished part of rec league hockey takes place: the post-game beer drinking with your buds.

“I play all this hockey, but I don’t seem to lose weight.”

At the end of the day, weight loss or gain is all about calories in versus calories out. Eat more calories than you need, you will store fat; consume less calories, you will drop weight. Most people do tend to underestimate the amount calories they eat and overestimate the amount of calories they burn doing exercise.

It Is Not About Discipline

It seems like at least once a week someone will ask me about how to be disciplined when it comes to having a better diet and/or sticking with an exercise routine. A lot of the time the genesis is around not having the will power to give up a poor diet, TV, or some other vice. If you search around the web on the topic, there are many articles and blogs about how to learn to exercise and make stronger “will power muscles” to accomplish goals. The problem with most of that is that the issue is not being disciplined, but rather having enough motivation. This applies to life in general, not just fitness.

Building Your Own Diet

I get asked quite a bit by friends and co-workers about the amount of calories to consume to achieve their various goals. Although this posting looks long, it is actually easy to calculate your needs; I just like adding a lot of rationale behind the steps.

Step 1: BMR

To understand how many calories you need, you first need to figure out how many calories you need to just maintain your current weight at rest. There are several equations that can be used to calculate your energy needs at rest, the basal metabolic rate (BMR).